NBA’s Hero’s:

  • Admiral Wade McClusky - During the 2nd world war, Admiral Wade McClusky, then a Lt. Commander, led his squadron of fighter planes - low on fuel, in searching out and destroying 3 Japanese aircraft carriers, together with all their planes at the battle of Midway. It was a major turning point in the war. Admiral McClusky is from Buffalo, New York.
  • Alexander The Great - Alexander The Great, known also as "Alexander of Macedonia" was one of the greatest wartime Generals in history - if not the greatest. He was a brilliant military strategist, conquering most of the then known world, and creating one of the largest empires ever known. His soldiers often numbered far less than most of the Armies he faced. He defeated them all. Alexander accomplished this all as a very young man, having died in the year 323 BC at age 33.
  • Audie Murphy - Audie Leon Murphy was the most decorated American Army combat soldier of World War II, receiving every award including "Valor" and the Congressional Medal of Honor. France and Italy also decorated him. Born into a large family of sharecroppers and abandoned by his father. Audie left school in the 5th grade and among other things - picked cotton to help support the family. After both the Navy and Marine Corp denied his enlistment, he turned to the US Army which accepted him. After the war he had a 21 year acting career. He died in a plane crash in 1971.
  • "Bear" Bryant - Paul William Bryant won six (6) national football championships during his coaching career at the University of Alabama. He broke the record for career victories by a college football head coach. He had thirteen (13) conference championships. So many great accomplishments. He was one of twelve children from a poor family.
  • Benjamin Franklin - The most accomplished American of his time, it was he who worked tirelessly for years to secure the support of France during the war between Great Britain and the colonies. This crucial French support enabled the colonial army to defeat Great Britain's General Cornwallis and take thousands of prisoners. Blocked by French warships form the rear and frontally facing hard-fighting colonial soldiers there was little he could do except surrender. This led to independence for the Colonies and then then Fledgling United States of America. Benjamin Franklin discovered electricity. And he had several important inventions to his credit.
  • Bill Halsey - Admiral William F. Halsey Jr. was an American naval commander during world war II and is one of only four individuals to have attained the rank "Fleet Admiral of the United States Navy". After the surprise bombing of Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941 he vowed revenge on its perpetrator Japanese Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto. Nearing the end of the Guadalcanal ferocities, Admiral Halsey received a tip from the highest command of the U.S. government that the Japanese code had been broken. Almost immediately thereafter it was learned that Admiral Yamamoto would travel by plane to a Japanese frontal area for a morale booster visit to his troops. Admiral Halsey was contacted and given a two-word order - "get Yamamoto" and was given his expected arrival time. How to do it was left up to Admiral Halsey. After careful deliberations with his staff he decided it would be by air and sent a squadron of fighter planes to intercept. With a reputation of punctuality to a fault, Yamamoto arrived exactly on schedule. The fighters were waiting and shot down Yamamoto's planes killing him together with all his staff, shortening the war. Truly a remarkable commander was Admiral Halsey.
  • George Patton - General George Patton, Jr, referred to by soldiers he commanded as "old blood and guts" served America in two world wars. An outstanding practitioner of mobile tank warfare. Strict discipline, toughness and self sacrifice created exceptional pride within his ranks. His motto: "Attack, Attack, Attack!" he believed saved more of his soldiers lives by keeping the enemy constantly on the defensive. The German army feared him more than any other allied general, indeed referring to him as the allies greatest general. General Patton loved to read. He attended the U.S. military academy at West Point, New York. No accolades are too high for this one-of-a-kind General.
  • Henry J Kaiser - American industrialist and entrepreneur.

  • John Harrison - 1693 - 1776  Penniless at the time, this self-educated clockmaker, ridiculed by many in the scientific community and many others in his native England, discovered after long experimentation - how to measure "longitude" and received a 20,000 lb reward. Fascinating. 

  • Paul Anderson - Worlds strongest man.

  • Rocky Marciano - Rocco Francis Marshegiano, the "Brocton Blockbuster" - is the only heavyweight champion ever to retire undefeated. He was a relentless, formidable puncher with extraordinary durability. The fact that he was smaller in stature than most of his opponents made no difference. Rocky would apply maximum pressure, knocking out most of his adversaries. He died young in a small plane crash.
  • Sam Phillips - Sam was a producer who started Sun Records in Memphis, Tennessee during the early 1950's. He understood the dream of unknown young newcomers and gave many of them a chance. An incredible judge of talent, it was Sam Phillips who gave us Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Elvis Presley, all of whom at the time had not a dime to pay for Sam's services. He was instrumental in launching Elvis's career in 1954 with the song "Blue Moon of Kentucky" He used only two backup musicians on the recording: Scottie Moore on guitar and Bill Black on upright bass. Sam liked what he heard. Enough said.
  • Sergeant York - Born December 13, 1887 Alvin C York was a highly decorated soldier during World War 1. One of eleven children he grew up very poor in rural Tennessee. Drafted into the Army he initially claimed conscientious objector status. After persuasion by his pastor and senior Army officers that his religion was not compatible with military service he was assigned to the 82nd Division and was sent to France. There his courageous actions captured single-handedly a large number of Germans. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Congressional Medal Of Honor. France, Italy and Montenegro also decorated him. He returned home where the people of Tennessee had built for him and his wife their dream home at the exact location they had personally selected before but could not nearly afford. This remarkable man was immortalized in the movie "Sergeant York".

  • Stonewall Jackson - Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall Jackson" was a confederate general during the civil war, becoming one of it's best known commanders. He was Robert E Lee's "go to" commander, playing a key role in winning almost all the battles he participated in. Unfortunately for the confederacy he was wounded seriously by friendly fire from which he never recovered. Tenacity and courage spawned the nickname "Stonewall".

  • Warren Spahn - Warren Edward Spahn, one of the best pitchers in Major League history, is the all time winningest left hander. He sported a 23-7 won-loss record at age 42 and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973 with 83% of the total vote. He enlisted in the United States Army in 1942 and served with distinction, seeing action in Germany at the Ludendorf Bridge as a combat engineer. Mostly based on this, one of the best war movies ever made, "The Bridge At Remagen" was filmed in later years. He saw action also in the Battle Of The Bulge. Warren is from Buffalo, New York.